A dead hedge

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new dead hedge on the east bank

I’d read about “dead hedges” and thought they would be a good way of putting some sort of – cheap – barrier up on the bank between us and the forest on the east side of the garden. It hasn’t happened yet but wild boar and deer could easily wander in one night and eat through the garden!

It would also be a way of disposing of the large amount of “brash” (foliage, small branches etc) we seem to generate. You just need to select some thickish branches to form the stakes for either side of the hedge, then infill to form the hedge.

Its going OK at the moment and looking just like the photos I saw online, which is always heartening. We will extend as we generate more brash and coppice and “lay” some of the smaller trees on the bank to help form the barrier.

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looking along the top of the hedge, stakes at either side.

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dead hedge with forest behind

You can more information about dead hedges at the following links.

http://www.askorganic.co.uk/composting/Make%20a%20Dead%20Hedge.htm

http://www.farminmypocket.co.uk/healthy-soil/designing-the-plot/how-to-make-a-dead-hedge

http://allanshepherd.com/2008/04/02/the-low-carbon-garden-making-wattle-hurdles-and-dead-hedges/

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/hedge-laying.html

4 thoughts on “A dead hedge

  1. afrenchgarden

    I’ve never heard of a dead hedge and it certainly gives pause for thought as we do generate a lot of branches. We have got a dead hole which we are trying to infill by the same method. My concern would be of strong vegetation such as brambles and trees growing rampant through the dead hedge and storing up a control problem in later years. Do you think that could happen? Amelia

    Reply
    1. datz Post author

      Hi Amelia
      Yes that could well occur. We’ll have to keep on top of that, but our garden is run more like an allotment and its a bit rough and ready anyway though we are continually at war with brambles throughout the garden! If your garden is already well cultivated, it might not be a good idea.

      Reply
      1. afrenchgarden

        I like the idea and as you say you have to keep on top of brambles and young seedlings in rough areas anyway. If anything it could de-limit the more “challenging” areas. 🙂

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